Author Archives: ksifferd

My hallucination; or, why some hallucinations aren’t exculpatory

  Much of the second half of this post is taken from a book chapter I co-authored with William Hirstein and Ty Fagan titled “Legal Insanity and Executive Function,” to appear in The Insanity Defense: Multidisciplinary Views on Its History, Trends, and Controversies, Palgrave Macmillan (White, M. Ed.). If you are interested in seeing citations […]

Success!

I am happy to announce that MIT Press has agreed to publish The Responsible Brain, a book I have been writing with my Elmhurst College colleagues William Hirstein and Tyler Fagan. Our research for the book was supported by a Philosophy and Science of Self Control sub-grant as a part of a Templeton Foundation funded project […]

Taking Stock

I have so many balls in the air this summer I’m having trouble keeping my projects organized. I thought it might help to publicly take stock of my commitments. Let me begin with the papers or chapters that are for the most part completed: I’ve already reviewed page proofs for a forthcoming chapter titled “Unconscious […]

Wringe’s Expressive Theory of Punishment

I recently wrote a review of Bill Wringe’s book An Expressive Theory of Punishment for the journal Ethics. You can find the review here.

Call for Commentators: new Brains blog symposium

The Brains blog invites philosophers and academics in other relevant disciplines to act as a commentator for our upcoming symposium, the second in our series on papers published in the journal Neuroethics. The target paper by Kevin Tobia (Yale) is titled “Personal Identity, Direction of Change, and Neuroethics” (abstract below). We are looking for short (1,000-2,000 […]

Chemical Castration as Punishment

Here is a draft of a book chapter on US chemical castration statutes I’m working up for this book edited by the great and indefatigable Nicole Vincent. Comments welcome!

Brains Blog Neuroethics Symposia

I’m helping to organize a new series of symposia on papers published in the journal Neuroethics over at Brains Blog. The first symposium has been published, and I highly recommend that anyone interested in cognitive enhancement (particularly moral enhancement) and personal identity take a look. The target article, by Farah Focquaert and Maartje Schermer, argues that […]