CV

Katrina L. Sifferd │ CURRICULUM VITAE

Department of Philosophy, Elmhurst College

190 Prospect Avenue, Elmhurst, IL 60126

Cell Phone: 630-347-0332 │Sifferdk@elmhurst.edu

 

Academic Positions Held

Current               Professor and Chair, Philosophy Department, Elmhurst College

2008-2012          Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Elmhurst College

2006-2008          Visiting Professor of Philosophy, Elmhurst College

2004-2005          Rockefeller Fellow in Law and Public Policy and Visiting Professor of Philosophy, Dartmouth College (Post-Doctoral Fellowship)

 

Expertise

Areas of Specialization:       Philosophy of Law (Criminal Responsibility and Punishment), Philosophy of Mind, Ethics

Area of Competence:            Ancient Philosophy

 

Education

October, 2004                  Ph.D. in Philosophy, University of London, King’s College

Thesis: “Psychology and the Criminal Law” (Supervised by David Papineau)

 

August, 2001                   M.A. in Philosophy, University of London, King’s College

Earned First Class Honors in Philosophy of Mind

Thesis: “How to Dissolve, Not Solve, the Frame Problem”

Granted the Susan B. Stebbing Studentship for Study in Philosophy (tuition scholarship)

 

June, 1996                       J.D., DePaul University College of Law

Named Best Orator of the 1996 student class

Admitted on tuition scholarship as a Dean’s Scholar

 

June, 1993                       B.A. in Psychology, Valparaiso University (Cum Laude)

 

Research

Works in Progress or Under Review

(Book Manuscript) The Responsible Brain, with William Hirstein and Tyler Fagan, under contract with MIT press.

(This book is supported by a $50,000 sub-grant from the Templeton Foundation as a part of   the Philosophy of Self-Control project headed by Al Mele of Florida State University.)

(Article) “Desert and Criminal Negligence”

(Article) “Can the State Enhance Legal Agency via Criminal Punishment?”

(Book Chapter) “Chemical Castration and other Direct Brain Interventions as Rehabilitative Treatment” to appear in Neuro-Interventions and the Law, Oxford University Press (N. Vincent Ed.).

(Book Chapter) “Non-Eliminative Reductionism: Not the theory of the mind/body relationship some criminal law theorists want, but the one they need,” for Neurolaw and Responsibility for Action: Concepts, Crimes and Courts, Cambridge University Press (B. Donnelly-Lazarov ed.).

Publications

(2017) “The Epistemology of Domestic Intelligence Gathering by Drone,” with Robert Brice, Louisiana Law Review 77(3): 805-831.

(2017) “Legal Insanity and Executive Function,” in The Insanity Defense: Multidisciplinary Views on Its History, Trends, and Controversies, Palgrave Macmillan (White, M. Ed.).

(2016) “Unconscious Mens Rea: Responsibility for lapses and minimally conscious states” in Law and Neuroscience: Philosophical Foundations, Oxford University Press (D. Patterson and Pardo, M., Eds.).

(2016) Essay Review of An Expressive Theory of Punishment by Bill Wringe (London: Palgrave Macmillian), Ethics 127(1): 319-323.

(2016) “Neuroethics” for the Encyclopedia of Human Behavior (3nd Edition), Elsevier, OUP (V.S. Ramachandran, Ed.).

(2016) “Innocent Minds: Child Soldiers, Executive Functions, and Culpability,” with Ty Fagan and William Hirstein, International Criminal Law Review 16 (2): 258-286.

(2016) “Virtue Ethics and Criminal Punishment,” in From Personality to Virtue, Oxford University Press (Weber and Masala, Eds.)

(2014) “What does it mean to be a mechanism? Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation,” special edition of Criminal Law & Philosophy on the work of Stephen Morse (N. Vincent Ed.): 1-17.

(2014) “The Significance of Psychopaths for Human Ethics,” with William Hirstein, in Brain Theory: Essays in Critical Neurophilosophy, Palgrave Macmillan (Charles Wolfe, Ed.).

(2013) “On the Criminal Culpability of Successful versus Unsuccessful Psychopaths” (with William Hirstein), Neuroethics 6: 129-140.

(2012) “Translating Scientific Evidence into the Language of the Folk: Executive Function as Capacity-Responsibility” in Legal Responsibility and Neuroscience, OUP series on neuroscience and law (N. Vincent, Ed., series editors: Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Lynn Nadel, and Fred Schauer).

(2012) “Changing the Criminal Character: Nanotechnology and Criminal Punishment,” in Proceedings of the Young Scholar Symposium on Law and Science, (A. Santosuosso, Ed.) University of Pavia Press, Italy.

(2011) “The Legal Self: Executive Process and Legal Theory”, with William Hirstein, Consciousness and Cognition, 20, 156-171.

(2008) “Nanotechnology and the Attribution of Responsibility”, Nanotechnology Law and Business Journal, 5(2), 177-190.

(2007) “Can Baird’s View of Adolescent Morality Inform Adolescent Criminal Justice Policy?” in Moral Psychology Vol. 3: The Neuroscience of Morality, Bradford Books (W. Sinnott-Armstrong, Ed.).

(2006) “In Defense of the Use of Commonsense Psychology in the Criminal Law”, Law and Philosophy 25: 571-612.

(2003) “You Can Get There From Here”, Essay Review of Daniel Dennett, Freedom Evolves, British Journal of the History and Philosophy of Psychology 5(1), 107.

(2003) Essay Review of Carolyn Price, Functions in Mind: A Theory of Intentional Content, British Journal of the History and Philosophy of Psychology 5(1), 104.

(2003) “Making sense of modern Darwinism”, Review of Laland and Brown, Sense and Nonsense, Heredity 90, 418.

Non-Philosophy Publications

(2010) “The Unique Challenges Posed by Mock Trial:  Evaluation and Assessment of a Simulation Course”, co-authored with Teri Bengtson, Journal of Political Science Education, 6(1), 70-86.

(2002) “A Process and Impact Evaluation of Cook County’s State’s Attorney’s Office Victim Witness Assistance Program”, Report Prepared for the National Institute of Justice, written with Stevens, P., Myrent, M. and Lurigio, A. (available at: http://www.icjia.org/public/pdf/researchreports/CCSAOVWAP.pdf).

Academic Presentations

(2017) Duke University, “Neuroscience and Criminal Responsibility,” the second Summer Seminar in Neuroscience and Philosophy (SSNAP2), (May 27).

(2017) University of Calgary Graduate Philosophy Conference, “The Responsible Brain,” Keynote Speaker (Calgary, Canada, May 4).

(2017) American Philosophical Association Pacific Meeting, “Saving Retributive Desert,” Invited Panelist (Seattle, April 13).

(2015) Conference on the Philosophy and Science of Self Control Templeton Grants “The Responsible Brain” (Florida State University, December 6-7).

(2015) Invited participant and presenter at the Mind/Brain/Responsibility Roundtable organized by Michael Moore (University of Illinois School of Law) and Richard Fumerton (University of Iowa) (Galena, IL, Sept. 24-27).

(2015) Conference on Paradigms of Mens Rea: The voluntariness criterion in the criminal law, “Reductivist Mens Rea” (European Union Institute, Florence, Italy, June 8-9).

(2015) Conference on Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Moral Responsibility, “The Brain Functions that Make Us Responsible (or Not)” (Utah Valley University, March 27-28).

(2015) University of Michigan, Mind and Moral Psychology Working Group, “Is Consciousness Necessary for Criminal Responsibility?” (March 9).

(2015) University of Bristol Colloquium talk, “Is Consciousness Necessary for Criminal Responsibility?” (February 10).

(2015) University of Cardiff Colloquium talk, “Is Consciousness Necessary for Criminal Responsibility?” (February 9).

(2014) International Conference: Neuro-interventions and the Law, “Using Neuro-interventions to Rehabilitate Sex Offenders” (Georgia State September 12-14).

(2014) Ethical Humanist- Society, Skokie, IL, “Consciousness and Criminal Responsibility” (January 19).

(2013) Dominican University, Siena Center, “Consciousness and Criminal Responsibility” (October 10).

(2013) European University Institute School of Law, Florence, Italy, “Morse, Non-Reductivism, and Mental Causation” (June 11).

(2013) Zygon Center, Chicago Advanced Seminar in Religion and Science, “The Criminal Character and Virtue Theory” (April 29).

(2012) University of Nebraska, Duluth Colloquium talk, “On the Responsibility of Psychopaths” (November 30).

(2012) University of Missouri, St. Louis Colloquium talk, “On the Responsibility of Psychopaths” (November 2).

(2012) Character and Personality Conference, “Neuro-Rehabilitation and the Criminal Character” (Paris-Sorbonne University July 3-4).

(2012) Society for Philosophy and Psychology annual conference, “On the Criminal Culpability of Successful versus Unsuccessful Psychopaths” (University of Colorado Boulder, June 22-24).

(2012) American Philosophical Association Central Division Annual Meeting, “Punishment of Late Stage Demented Offenders” (Comment on Annette Durfner’s paper, “Late Stage Demented Offenders”) (February 17)

(2011) Law & Science Young Scholars Symposium, European Center for Law, Science and New Technologies (ECLT), “Changing the Criminal Character: Nanotechnology and Criminal Sentencing” (University of Pavia, Italy, June 9).

(2009) International Conference ‘Moral Responsibility: Neuroscience, Organization & Engineering,’ “Using Executive Function as a Bridge to Neuroscience in the Criminal Courts” (Delft University, the Netherlands, August 24-27)

(2007) IIT Chicago Kent College of Law Institute for Biotechnology and the Human Future Symposium ‘The Spotless Mind,’  “The Intersect of Science and Criminal Responsibility” (Comment upon Patricia Churchland’s Keynote Address) (National Press Club, Washington DC, February 16).

(2007) IIT Kent College of Law Institute for Biotechnology and the Human Future Symposium on ‘Body Worlds,’ “Commoditization, Consent and Empathy” (January 26).

(2006) American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division “On the Dangers of Allowing Soldiers to Dictate Public Policy with Their Feet” (Comment upon ‘Soldiers, Slaves and the Liberal State’ by David Garren) (December 30).

(2005) American Philosophical Association, Central Division “Eliminativism about Commonsense Psychological Concepts in the Criminal Law” (Colloquium Session) (April 28).

(2005) Legal Studies Program, Dartmouth College “The Role of Psychology in the Criminal Law” (February 2).

(2004) Society for the Evolutionary Analysis in Law Annual Meeting “Scientific Psychology and the Criminal Law” (Atlanta, October 13-15).

(2003) Human Behavior and Evolution Society, “Eliminativism about Folk Psychology in the Criminal Law” (Lincoln, Nebraska, June 3-6).

(2003) Brain and Cognition Research Group, “Commonsense Psychology as the Grounds for Attributions of Culpability in Criminal Law” (Nottingham Trent University, May 21).

(2002) Inaugural Speech, Departmental Weekend at Cumberland Lodge “Serving Dinner vs. Saving Lives: Applying Philosophy to Criminal Law” (Philosophy Department, King’s College London, Oct 11).

(2002) Evolution and the Emotions Working Group, “The Difference between Ignorance and Dismissal: A Solution to the Frame Problem” (King’s College London, March 20).

(2002) Darwin @ LSE Work In Progress Group, “How to Avoid the Frame Problem” (London School of Economics, Feb 25).

(2001) Symposium on the Frame Problem, “How to Avoid the Frame Problem” (New College, Oxford University, Nov 15).

Non-Academic Work Experience

1996-1998          Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority, Chicago, Illinois Senior Research Analyst/Criminologist

Contract employee funded by the National Institute of Justice. Managed a $450,000 federal project to assess the physical and psychological effects of victimization and the ability of the judicial system to address victim needs. Performed analysis of crime trends and juvenile and female offenders.

Professional Memberships

American Philosophical Association, Central Division

Society for Philosophy and Psychology

Illinois Bar Association, licensed attorney

Other Honors, Awards and Activities

Reviewer for the journals Erkenntnis, Synthese, Res Philosophica, Neuroethics, Pacific Philosophical Quarterly, and Social Theory and Practice.

Contributing Editor for the blog http://www.philosophyofbrains.org.

Certified to Defend Capital Murder Cases in Illinois (Moot now due to the Illinois moratorium on the death penalty)

Fully Funded Participant in the Summer Institute on Bounded Rationality and the Law (2003, Max Planck Institute, Berlin, Germany)

External Grants Awarded

2015-2016          Awarded $50,000 sub-grant as a part of the Philosophy of Self-Control Templeton Foundation grant headed by Al Mele (Florida State University)

2012                 Awarded $1,000 from the MacArthur Foundation (and $3,500 from the Elmhurst College Center for Scholarship and Teaching) to attend Neuroscience Bootcamp at the University of Pennsylvania (July 30-August 9)

Internal Grants Awarded

2010                 Awarded $3,500 to do interdisciplinary research on the topic of ethics and the criminal law; used $1,000 of these funds to support a student research assistant (Elmhurst College Center for Scholarship and Teaching)

2010                 Awarded a $4000 faculty grant with Pat Ackles (Chair, Psychology Department) to develop a bi-disciplinary general education course on Neuroethics (Elmhurst College Center for Scholarship and Teaching)

2009                 Awarded $1,000 to support students in their undergraduate research (Elmhurst College Center for Scholarship and Teaching)

2009                 Awarded a $4,000 faculty grant with Richard Greenleaf (Chair, Criminal Justice Department) to develop a bi-disciplinary course on Capital Punishment (Elmhurst College Center for Scholarship and Teaching)

References

William Hirstein

Professor

Department of Philosophy, Elmhurst College

williamh@elmhurst.edu │630-617-3582

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong

Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics

Philosophy Department and the Kenan Institute for Ethics, Duke University

ws66@duke.edu │603-715-7447

David Papineau

Professor

Department of Philosophy, King’s College London

David.papineau@kcl.ac.uk │020 7848 2351